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Do you have technology jobs you’re looking to fill? If so, you’re in good company. Last month, U.S. organizations in all industries filled an estimated 253,000 IT job positions, the category’s largest 1-month gain since late 2015.

Within just the IT industry alone, companies added some 7,500 new tech jobs in February. That month, hiring by the rest of the economy was sluggish.

That’s according to recent analysis by CompTIA, an IT trade association, which dug into early-March employment figures from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

While the tech numbers were strong, the overall economy was relatively weak. U.S. employers across all industries added only 20,000 jobs in February, the lowest number in a year and a half, reports the BLS.

Sector by sector

Here’s CompTIA’s analysis of the U.S. tech sector’s top 5 employment categories for the month of February:

> IT & software services / computer-systems design: 3,300 new hires added

> Computer, electronics & semiconductor manufacturing: 2,500 new hires

> Data processing, hosting & related services: 2,400 new hires

> Other info services, including search portals: 1,600 new hires

> Telecom: 2,300 jobs eliminated, marking the category’s fourth consecutive month of job losses

All that brought the U.S. IT sector’s total employment in February to 4.62 million jobs, CompTIA finds.

The tech sector’s overall strength is reflected in the U.S. unemployment numbers, too. For just IT workers, the unemployment rate in February was 2.3%, down slightly from 2.5% a year earlier. For the entire U.S. economy, the unemployment rate in February was a higher 3.8%, leaving 6.2 million Americans unemployed.

And tomorrow…?

Looking ahead, the picture is mixed. The number of technology job listings declined by nearly 40,000 positions from January to February. But plenty of organizations still report that highly technical jobs remain hard to fill.

Among the “help wanted” listings, CompTIA finds, the 3 most sought-after employees are software/application developers, user-support specialists, and systems engineers and architects.

Sure, tech providers need to hire individuals, not statistics. But isn’t it good to know you’re in good company?

 

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Cloud and Data Centers